Self Assessment

Please answer the following simple questions to receive a recommendation on your next steps.

Fertility Self Assessment Tool *

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Question 1

How long have you been trying to get pregnant?

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less than 6 months
more than 6 months, less than 1 year
more than 1 year


Question 1 Information

How long have you been trying to get pregnant?

80 % of women conceive within one year of regular unprotected sex.1 Over the age of 35 years, fertility may decline and hence the  cut-off becomes six months.2

Question 2

What is your age?

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under 35
35 or older
 

Question 2 Information

What is your age?

 

In women, fertility declines more quickly with age. This decline becomes rapid after the age of 35. A range of factors cause this, especially the decline in the quality of the eggs being released by the ovaries.2

Question 3

Would you consider yourself to be underweight, overweight or obese (Click here to determine your Body Mass Index- BMI)?

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No
Underweight
Overweight/ Obese

Question 3 Information

Are you overweight?

 

Being underweight, overweight or obese is categorised by body mass index (BMI) and may affect your fertility. Lifestyle changes or other therapies initiated by a doctor may help women to get pregnant.3

Question 4

Do you smoke?

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 Yes
   No
   

Question 4 Information

Do you smoke?

 

Smoking, including passive smoking, can affect fertility in both sexes. Smoking affects a woman's chance of conceiving, while in men there's an association between smoking and poor semen quality.5

Question 5

Do you struggle with irregular or absent periods?

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Yes
No

Question 5 Information

Do you struggle with irregular or absent periods?

 

A period forms part of a woman's menstrual cycle and occurs approximately every 28 days as the body prepares to receive a fertilized egg. Irregular periods and menstrual disorders disrupt the monthly cycle and may impact fertility.6

 

Question 6

Have you been diagnosed with either an overactive or underactive thyroid condition in the past?

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Yes
No

Question 6 Information

Have you been diagnosed with either an overactive or underactive thyroid condition in the past?

 

Both an overactive thyroid gland and an underactive thyroid gland can cause hormonal changes that may affect ovulation.5

 

Question 7

Have you ever been diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

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Yes
No
 

Question 7 Information

Have you ever been diagnosed with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS)?

 

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common condition that affects how a woman's ovaries work.7

   

The 3 main features of PCOS are:7
1. Irregular periods – which means a woman’s ovaries do not regularly release eggs (ovulation).
2. Excess androgen – high levels of "male" hormones in the body, which may cause physical signs such
     as excess facial or body hair, or acne.
3. Polycystic ovaries – the ovaries become enlarged and contain many fluid-filled sacs (follicles) which can
     be seen using an ultrasound.

Question 8

Do you have any fertility-related problems in your family?

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 Yes
   No
   

Question 8 Information

Do you have any fertility-related problems in your family?

 

Causes of infertility may run in the family. Knowing the specifics of family fertility problems may help in determining the action required for the couple to get pregnant.8

     

Question 9

Have you had an ectopic pregnancy or any other pelvic surgery?

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 Yes
   No
   

Question 9 Information

Have you had an ectopic pregnancy or any other pelvic surgery?

 

Ectopic pregnancy is where a fertilised egg implants, and starts to develop, outside the womb. These pregnancies cannot continue to birth. Around 1 percent of pregnancies are ectopic pregnancies.9 Previous surgery for an ectopic pregnancy , removal of the fallopian tube, or any other pelvic surgery may reduce the chances of  natural conception.9

     

Question 10

Have you been diagnosed with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or a sexually transmitted infection (STI)?

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Yes
No

Question 10 Information

Have you been diagnosed with pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) or a sexually transmitted infection (STI)?

 

Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of the female upper genital tract, including the womb, fallopian tubes and ovaries. Often it is caused by a sexually transmitted infection (STI), such as chlamydia or gonorrhoea. The fallopian tubes can become scarred and narrowed if they're affected by PID, which may make it difficult for eggs to pass from the ovaries into the womb. This may increase the chances of an ectopic pregnancy and may impact a woman’s fertility.5 

Question 11

Have you been diagnosed with endometriosis?

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Yes
No

Question 11 Information

Have you been diagnosed with endometriosis?

 

Endometriosis is a condition where tissue similar to the lining of the womb starts to grow in other places, such as the ovaries and fallopian tubes.10  Endometriosis can affect women of any age and can impact a woman’s ability to fall pregnant.10 

Result

It is common for it to take longer than 6 months to get pregnant and in the majority of cases this does not indicate any problem.

After the age of 35, fertility problems become more common.

It can help if you have sex more often during the most fertile part of your monthly cycle. At least every other day is recommended.

It you have any concerns you should arrange to see your GP.

You may want to seek the advice of a Fertility specialist to determine if your health conditions are impacting your fertility. If so, click on the Find Clinic button below.

Result

Based on some of your responses, you may want to seek the advice of a Fertility specialist to determine if your health conditions are impacting your fertility.

If so, click on the Find Clinic button below.

It you have any concerns you should arrange to see your GP.

References:

Merck Fertility Booklet